Using dimensional analysis, predict the units of wavelength in the de Broglie hypothesis equation: lambda = h/mv joule-seconds (J*s) kilogram (kg) meters (m) seconds (s) meters per second (m/s) per second (/s) per meter (/m) per kilogram (/kg)

Mainuillato2p 2022-09-26 Answered
Using dimensional analysis, predict the units of wavelength in the de Broglie hypothesis equation: λ = h m v
joule-seconds ( J s)
kilogram (kg)
meters (m)
seconds (s)
meters per second (m/s)
per second (/s)
per meter (/m)
per kilogram (/kg)
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Answers (1)

Jaelyn Levine
Answered 2022-09-27 Author has 9 answers
Given, λ = h m v
We know
[ h ] = M L 2 T 1 [ m ] = M [ V ] = L T 1
So dimension λ will be,
[ λ ] = [ h ] [ m ] [ v ] = M L 2 T 1 M L T 1 = L
So unit λ qill be meters.
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