The speed of electron.

Israel Hale 2022-07-20 Answered
The speed of electron.
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Answers (1)

kamphundg4
Answered 2022-07-21 Author has 20 answers
Explanation of Solution
Using De Broglie’s equation,
λ = h m v
Here, λ is the wavelength, h is the Planck’s constant, m is the mass of electron and v is the speed of electron.
Re-arrange the equation to get v.
v = h m λ
Conclusion:
Substitute 6.63 × 10 34 J s for h, 9.11 × 10 31 k g for m and 0.1 nm for λ to get v
v = 6.63 × 10 34 J s ( 9.11 × 10 31 k g ) ( 0.1 n m )
= 6.63 × 10 34 J s ( 9.11 × 10 31 k g ) ( 0.1 × 10 9 m )
= 7.28 × 10 6 m / s
Therefore, speed of electron is = 7.28 × 10 6 m / s
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