Isotope, One of the two or more species of atoms of a chemical element with the same atomic number and position in the periodic table and nearly identical chemical behaviour but with different atomic masses and physical properties. every chemical element has one or more Isotopes. 3 examples of isotopes. for example what these mass numbers denote before further progress?

mydaruma25 2022-09-23 Answered
Isotope, One of the two or more species of atoms of a chemical element with the same atomic number and position in the periodic table and nearly identical chemical behaviour but with different atomic masses and physical properties. every chemical element has one or more Isotopes. 3 examples of isotopes. for example what these mass numbers denote before further progress?
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r2t1orrso
Answered 2022-09-24 Author has 8 answers
The mass number of an atom is the total number of protons and neutrons in its nucleus. All atoms of the same element have the same number of protons in their nuclei (this is the atomic number of the element), but they can have different numbers of neutrons. A carbon atom with six protons and six neutrons in its nucleus is a different isotope from a carbon atom with six protons and seven neutrons in its nucleus.
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