Why should the gradient be 0 at a critical point?

rivasguss9 2022-08-08 Answered
Why should the gradient be 0 at a critical point?
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Answers (1)

burgesia1w
Answered 2022-08-09 Author has 11 answers
Why should the gradient be 0 at a critical point?
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