If an object has very energetic particles in it like that of the sun then wouldn't its mass be higher hence making its gravity greater than that of the still state ones ?

Ishaan Booker 2022-07-15 Answered
If an object has very energetic particles in it like that of the sun then wouldn't its mass be higher hence making its gravity greater than that of the still state ones ?
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LitikoIDu6
Answered 2022-07-16 Author has 10 answers
Inertial mass of an object is pretty much constant. Relativistic mass can sound a bit misleading, but it really just refers to the relativistic momentum of an object in special relativity. So while an object moving fast with respect to an inertial observer has more relativistic mass than it would if it were at rest w.r.t. the observer, it's inertial mass ( which equals its gravitational mass ) stays the same.

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New questions

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Ive tried figuring these out but i need help