If a body A is moving with a constant velocity v and an observer on that body A observes

Kendall Oneill 2022-05-14 Answered
If a body A is moving with a constant velocity v and an observer on that body A observes another body B to be at rest then the kinetic energy of B is zero. So is energy dependent on the frame of reference if so then how is the conservation of energy stated?
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Answers (1)

Arturo Wallace
Answered 2022-05-15 Author has 17 answers
Energy is conserved in each inertial frame.
As every inertial frame is equally plausible, there is no absolute velocity and therefore no absolute kinetic energy.
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