What is meant by the term commutative in algebra? Explain along with an example.

socorraob

socorraob

Answered

2022-01-06

What is meant by the term commutative in algebra? Explain along with an example.

Answer & Explanation

Cassandra Ramirez

Cassandra Ramirez

Expert

2022-01-07Added 30 answers

Definition:
The Commutative property in algebra states that order does not matter.
In other words, if ‘*’ is an operation and a*b = b*a for all a and b, then * is a commutative.
Example: (Commutative)
Addition: a+b=b+a.
Multiplication: ab=ba.
Example: (non-Commutative)
Subtraction : abba.
Division : (ab)(ba).
Louis Page

Louis Page

Expert

2022-01-08Added 34 answers

The commutative property states that the numbers on which we operate can be moved or swapped from their position without making any difference to the answer. The property holds for Addition and Multiplication, but not for subtraction and division

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