The marginal cost per book.

rocedwrp 2020-11-05 Answered
The marginal cost per book.
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izboknil3
Answered 2020-11-06 Author has 99 answers
Given:
The total cost (in dollars) of producing x college algebra books is C (x) = 42.5x + 80,000.
Explanation:
The given cost function is a linear cost function of the form C (x) = mx + b,
Where b represents the fixed cost, x is the number of items and m represents the marginal cost.
So on comparison with the generalized cost function, the marginal cost is $42.50.

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