Each exterior angle of a regular polygon is 18 degrees. How many sides does the polygon have?

Alfredo Cooley 2022-11-19 Answered
Each exterior angle of a regular polygon is 18 degrees. How many sides does the polygon have?
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Answers (1)

takwerkyo0
Answered 2022-11-20 Author has 17 answers
Find the fraction of two consecutive terms hence
r = 6 - 3 = - 2
Hence the ratio is r=−2
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