f cts on [a,b] and f(x)≠0 for all x∈[a,b] implies that f(x) is either always positive or negative on [a,b].

Owen Mathis 2022-11-18 Answered
f cts on [ a , b ] and f ( x ) 0 for all x [ a , b ] implies that f ( x ) is either always positive or negative on [ a , b ].
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Brooklyn Mcintyre
Answered 2022-11-19 Author has 18 answers

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