If time in systems moving with different speed goes differently, does speed of entropy change differ in these systems?

Hanna Webster 2022-11-13 Answered
If time in systems moving with different speed goes differently, does speed of entropy change differ in these systems?
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Answers (1)

Lillianna Salazar
Answered 2022-11-14 Author has 22 answers
Entropy is an invariant S S = S, whereas time is not, in general. Therefore the rate of change of entropy (this is the correct term) is a frame dependant quantity.
d S d t = γ d S d t = γ d S d t
with γ the time-dilation factor.
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