Find the indicated expression of 1/2m inches in feet

Martin Hart 2022-10-22 Answered
Find the indicated expression of 1/2m inches in feet
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Answers (1)

Carly Yang
Answered 2022-10-23 Author has 19 answers
1 2 m  inches × 12  inches 1  feet = 6 m  feet
Your answer is 6m feet.
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