How do you use the Counting Principle to find the probability of choosing the 5 winning lottery numbers when the numbers are chosen at random from 0 to 9?

taumulurtulkyoy 2022-10-20 Answered
How do you use the Counting Principle to find the probability of choosing the 5 winning lottery numbers when the numbers are chosen at random from 0 to 9?
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Answers (1)

Kash Osborn
Answered 2022-10-21 Author has 18 answers
We have a 5-digit number and we're trying to calculate the odds of guessing the number correctly.
For each digit, there is a 1/10 chance of getting it right. There are 5 digits, and so according to the Counting Principle, we multiply all of them together:
( 1 10 ) ( 1 10 ) ( 1 10 ) ( 1 10 ) ( 1 10 ) = 1 10 5 = 1 10 , 000 = 0.0001
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