True and False? Let A and B be nonempty sets and 1−1 be a 1−1 function. Then f(X∩Y)=f(X)∩f(Y) for all nonempty subsets X and Y of A

Madilyn Quinn 2022-10-23 Answered
True and False?
Let A and B be nonempty sets and 1 1 be a 1 1 function. Then f ( X Y ) = f ( X ) f ( Y ) for all nonempty subsets X and Y of A
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Answers (1)

Tirioliwo
Answered 2022-10-24 Author has 12 answers
True. The injective f is a bijection to f ( A ), and applying a bijection commutes with and .
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