Find the probability of using debit card Our professor gave this question as assignment, My question is does this question have all information needed to solve it? I asked her and she said it has all information but still I cannot figure out how I can solve it with just knowing the probability of using debit card in supermarket. Can someone please provide me a tip on how I can solve this question with this information or is it solvable? According to a recent Interact survey, 28% of consumers use their debit cards in supermarkets. Find the probability that they use debit cards in only other stores or not at all.

taumulurtulkyoy 2022-10-23 Answered
Find the probability of using debit card
Our professor gave this question as assignment, My question is does this question have all information needed to solve it? I asked her and she said it has all information but still I cannot figure out how I can solve it with just knowing the probability of using debit card in supermarket. Can someone please provide me a tip on how I can solve this question with this information or is it solvable?
According to a recent Interact survey, 28% of consumers use their debit cards in supermarkets. Find the probability that they use debit cards in only other stores or not at all.
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Answers (1)

Remington Wells
Answered 2022-10-24 Author has 13 answers
The intended answer is mostly likely 72%. This is because to say that a consumer uses his/her debit cards "in only other stores or not at all" is logically equivalent to saying that he/she does not use his/her debit cards in supermarkets. So if 28% of consumers do use their debit cards in supermarkets, then 72% do not.
That said, the problem strikes me as not well worded. In giving the answer of 72%, I am assuming that what's meant by "the probability that they use debit cards..." is the probability that a randomly selected individual consumer uses his/her debit cards only in other stores or not at all. As stated, however, it's asking about the probability that an entire collection of consumers use their debit cards in a certain way.
Whether you read the "they" as referring to the entire set of consumers, or just to the 28% who use them at supermarkets (as quasi's answer does), the answer is 0. It's possible the person writing the question really meant it this way, as quasi suggests; I think it's more likely they were just a bit sloppy in their wording. I know I sometimes am.
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