If we increase the number of turns in a coil, the resistance increases, to overcome this, we can use very thicker wire and keep the voltage low to keep the current constant, and by the formula, this should make stronger electromagnet even by supplying less voltage. Can we make stronger electromagnet by using less voltage and current but very thicker wire and more number of turns in a coil?

Ignacio Riggs 2022-10-16 Answered
If we increase the number of turns in a coil, the resistance increases, to overcome this, we can use very thicker wire and keep the voltage low to keep the current constant, and by the formula, this should make stronger electromagnet even by supplying less voltage.
Can we make stronger electromagnet by using less voltage and current but very thicker wire and more number of turns in a coil?
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Answers (2)

rcampas4i
Answered 2022-10-17 Author has 22 answers
You forgot one parameter: Length. The magnetic field B is proportional to the turn density, denoted by n. n = N / L , where N - no of turns and L - length of the solenoid. So if you wish to increase the thickness of the wire, you wouldn't be able to fit the same number of turns in the same length. The turns will be less and hence the field. So only option remains is to increase the length, which in turn would keep the ratio N / L constant.
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Lance Liu
Answered 2022-10-18 Author has 2 answers
What determines the electromagnet's strength is how much current is flowing in the wire and how many turns there are in the coil. Of course smaller, longer wire has more resistance and requires a larger voltage to drive the same current. Your choice of power supply will determine the maximum current that it can drive through a given resistance.
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