Draw the Hasse diagram representing the partial ordering {(a, b) | a divides b} on {1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12}.

Question
Discrete math
asked 2020-11-24
Draw the Hasse diagram representing the partial ordering {(a, b) | a divides b} on {1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12}.

Answers (1)

2020-11-25
R=(1.1),(1.2),(1.3),(1.4),(1.6),(1.8),(1.12),(2.2),(2.4),(2.6),(2.8),(2.12),(3.3),(3.6),(3.12),(4.4),(4.8),(4.12),(6.6),(6.12),(8.8),(12.12).
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