5. How many years does the first 10 yards represent? What events are within the first 10 yards of the football field from the TODAY end zone? Explain what this means in terms of expansion of life on Earth.

Izabelle Lowery 2022-10-15 Answered
5. How many years does the first 10 yards represent? What events are within the first 10 yards of the football field from the TODAY end zone? Explain what this means in terms of expansion of life on Earth.
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Answers (1)

silenthunter440
Answered 2022-10-16 Author has 19 answers
Based on the length of a football field and the timeline of earth's history, the first 10 yards represents 460 million years.
Beginning from 460 million years ago, there was massive explosion and expansion of life on earth.
What is a timeline of earth's history?A timeline of earth's history shows the events that occurred from the beginning when earth was formed 4.6 billion years ago until today.
In this activity, a football field is used to represent the timeline of earth's history.
Each end of the football field represents the two end zones, Earth's beginning and TODAY end zone.
A football field is 100 yards long.
The earth is 4,600,000,000 years old.
Each yard equals 46,000,000 years
Thus, the first 10 yards equals = 46,000,000 × 10 The The first 10 yards = 460,000,000 years.
From the TODAY end zone, the the first 10 yards = 460,000,000 years.
460,000,000 years ago marked the time from the appearance of the first plants until humans and all life on earth as it is today.
This, meant that within this period, there was massive explosion and expansion of life on earth.
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