To determine To Calculate: Momentum of photon by using equation p=mv

Krish Logan 2022-10-14 Answered
To determine
To Calculate: Momentum of photon by using equation p = m v
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Answers (1)

Layton Leach
Answered 2022-10-15 Author has 15 answers
Light is composed of photons which do not have any rest mass. So, one cannot find the momentum of a photon using the equation p = m v , which requires mass for the calculation of the momentum.
The momentum of a photon can be calculated using the de Broglie wavelength equation:
p = h λ
Where, h is the Planck’s constant and λ is the wavelength.
Conclusion:
One cannot use p = m v to find the momentum of a photon.
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