Charlie and Clare are playing a number-guessing game. Charlie picked two numbers between 1 and 5. To win the game, Clare must guess both his numbers in three lines. Her guesses, simulated using a random-number generator are shown in the table. If Charlie's numbers are 1 and 3, what is the experimental probability that Clare won?

Charlie and Clare are playing a number-guessing game. Charlie picked two numbers between 1 and 5. To win the game, Clare must guess both his numbers in three lines. Her guesses, simulated using a random-number generator are shown in the table. If Charlie's numbers are 1 and 3, what is the experimental probability that Clare won?

Question
Probability
asked 2021-01-27
Charlie and Clare are playing a number-guessing game. Charlie picked two numbers between 1 and 5. To win the game, Clare must guess both his numbers in three lines. Her guesses, simulated using a random-number generator are shown in the table. If Charlie's numbers are 1 and 3, what is the experimental probability that Clare won?

Answers (1)

2021-01-28
There are 10 trials given and thus there are 10 possible outcomes.
# of possible outcomes = 10
3 of the 10 trials result in both the numbers 1 and 3 being guessed and thus there are 3 favorable outcomes.
# of favorable outcomes = 3
The probability is the number of favorable outcomes divided by the number of possible outcomes:
P(Clave won)=# of favorable outcomes/# of possible outcomes=\(\displaystyle\frac{{3}}{{10}}={0.3}={30}\%\)
0

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