Sample 1 has 17 "yes" responses out of 97 in the sample, sample 2 has "yes" 46 responses out of 131 responses in the sample. Calculate the point estimate for the difference between the population proportions of "yes" responses.

Question
Probability
asked 2021-01-31
Sample 1 has 17 "yes" responses out of 97 in the sample, sample 2 has "yes" 46 responses out of 131 responses in the sample. Calculate the point estimate for the difference between the population proportions of "yes" responses.

Answers (1)

2021-02-01
Given that Sample 1 has 17 "yes" responses out of 97 responses in the sample, and Sample 2 has 46 "yes" responses out of 131 responses in the sample.
We need to calculate the point estimane for the difference between the population proportions of "yes" responses.
Point estimate: We define p is the point estimate for population proportions.
p=x/need where x is the number of successes and n is the population size.
Now, for the Sample 1 the point estimate for the population proportion is
PSKp1=x/n =17/97 =0.17525ZSK
and for the Sample 2 the point estimate for the population proportion is
PSKp2=x/n =46/131 =0.35114ZSK
Therefore, the point estimate for the difference between the population proportion of "yes" responses is
PSKp=p1-p2 =0.17525-0.35114 =-0.17589ZSK
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