Calculate the de Broglie wavelength of electrons accelerated through 3868 V. Round off the answer to 2 decimal places with scientific representation.

Riya Andrews 2022-10-09 Answered
Calculate the de Broglie wavelength of electrons accelerated through 3868 V. Round off the answer to 2 decimal places with scientific representation.
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Answers (1)

Krha77
Answered 2022-10-10 Author has 8 answers
Given data: -
The potential difference is V = 3868 V.
Here, the mass of the electron is m = 9.1 × 10 31 k g, the value of the Planck's constant is h = 6.62 × 10 34 J-s and the charge on electron is e = 1.6 × 10 19 C.
The expression for the DE Broglie wavelength of electrons is given as,
λ = h 2 m e V
Substitute all the known values in above equation,
λ = 6.62 × 10 34 J s 2 × 9.1 × 10 31 k g × 1.6 × 10 19 C × 3868 V λ = 1.97 × 10 11 m
Thus, the DE Broglie wavelength of electrons is λ = 1.97 × 10 11 m
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