1) From inside the room I would view the light moving north at the speed of light 2) From outside the room, observing from a stationary position, would the light exiting the window move at twice the speed of light? or would it change speed?

rancuri5a 2022-09-06 Answered
1) From inside the room I would view the light moving north at the speed of light
2) From outside the room, observing from a stationary position, would the light exiting the window move at twice the speed of light? or would it change speed?
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Answers (1)

Tristin Durham
Answered 2022-09-07 Author has 6 answers
1) That's true.
2) No, it will still move at speed of light, thus theoretically outer observer will never see any light coming out of that window in this case, this is simple result of Velocity-addition formula in special relativity.
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