The probability of rain in San Francisco on a given day is 1/6. The probability of rain in Miami is 5/6. Use two number cubes to find the simulated probability of rain in both cities.

lwfrgin 2020-10-23 Answered
The probability of rain in San Francisco on a given day is \(\displaystyle\frac{{1}}{{6}}\). The probability of rain in Miami is \(\displaystyle\frac{{5}}{{6}}\). Use two number cubes to find the simulated probability of rain in both cities.

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yunitsiL
Answered 2020-10-24 Author has 22103 answers
Given:
Probability rain San Francisco= \(\displaystyle\frac{{1}}{{6}}\)
Probability rain Miami = \(\displaystyle\frac{{5}}{{6}}\)
Let us consider a blue and red number cube. The blue number cube will represent San Francisco and the red number cube will represent Miami.
A number cube has 6 possible outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,6.
The probability of rain in San Franciscois then simulated by the blue number cube, when exactly 1 of the 6 possible outcomes on the blue number cube correspond with rain (while the other outcomes correspond with no rain) as the probability of rain needs to be 1/6.
Let Blue 1=rain in San Francisco and Blue 2, 3, 4, 5, 6=no rain in San Francisco.
The probability of rain in Miami is then simulated by the red number cube, when exactly 5 of the 6 possible outcomes on the red number cuthe correspond with rain (while the other outcome corresponds with no rain) as the probability of rain needs to be 5/6.
Tet Red 1=no rain it Miami and Red 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 = rain in Miami
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