A large urn in your kitchen is full of fruit. There are six apples, four oranges, and five pears. What percentage of the mixed fruit are apples? What percentage are not apples?

Question
A large urn in your kitchen is full of fruit. There are six apples, four oranges, and five pears. What percentage of the mixed fruit are apples? What percentage are not apples?

Answers (1)

2020-11-21
The urn contains 6 apples, 4 oranges, and 5 pears so there are 6+4+5=15 fruits in the urn. The percentage of the fruit that are apples is then \(\displaystyle\frac{{6}}{{15}}={0.4}={40}\%\). The percentage that are not apples is then 100%-40%=60%
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