What would the critical points be of this equation? dy/dx=(-4x)/(1+x^2)^2

planhetkk 2022-09-05 Answered
What would the critical points be of this equation?
d y d x = 4 x ( 1 + x 2 ) 2
I just dont understand how find them with a reciprocal function. If someone could explain how to find it in this this situation that would be fantasic!
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Answers (1)

Derick Ortiz
Answered 2022-09-06 Author has 11 answers
Explanation:
The critical point of a function is a value of x in the domain of f such that either f′(x) is 0 or undefined. From your equation, f ( x ) = 0 x = 0, and f′(x) is always defined for all x. So x = 0 is the only critical value.
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