Do we assume that the rest mass of a fundamental particle is constant in all inertial reference frames? i.e. is the rest mass of an electron if it is travelling at constant velocity c/2 (relative to the distant stars) the same as the rest mass of the electron if it is travelling at velocity 0 relative to the distant stars?

odcinaknr 2022-09-06 Answered
Do we assume that the rest mass of a fundamental particle is constant in all inertial reference frames? i.e. is the rest mass of an electron if it is travelling at constant velocity c/2 (relative to the distant stars) the same as the rest mass of the electron if it is travelling at velocity 0 relative to the distant stars?
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Answers (1)

Farbwolkenw
Answered 2022-09-07 Author has 6 answers
Rest mass is the Lorentz invariant absolute value of the particle's energy momentum 4-vector.
m 2 = p 2 = E 2 p 2
If you don't use c = 1 units, that's
m 2 c 4 = E 2 ( p c ) 2
Lorentz invariant means "the same in all inertial reference frames".
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