Is it possible to compress gas without making it hotter?

sengihantq 2022-09-01 Answered
Is it possible to compress gas without making it hotter?
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Answers (1)

Rachael Singh
Answered 2022-09-02 Author has 4 answers
Consider an ideal gas at 300 K at a pressure of 1 atm. The ideal gas law gives a density of about 2 × 10 25 . So you'd expect that you'd be able to move the piston a distance of about 1 / λ = 5 × 10 22 m before it collides with a gas particle. This is an incredibly tiny distance, about 10 6 times the size of a proton. The upshot is that it's practically impossible for the situation you're describing to occur. As soon as you move the piston at all, it will collide with a gas particle.
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