Consider a proton with a 6.6 fm wavelength. What is the velocity of the proton in meters per second? Assume the proton is nonrelativistic. (1 femtometer = 10^(-15) m)

Aryan Lowery 2022-10-02 Answered
Consider a proton with a 6.6 fm wavelength. What is the velocity of the proton in meters per second? Assume the proton is nonrelativistic. (1 femtometer = 10 15 m)
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Answers (1)

Gabriella Hensley
Answered 2022-10-03 Author has 6 answers
Wavelength , λ = 6.6 f m = 6.6 × 10 15 m
To find = Velocity of proton
We can calculate the velocity using :
De Broglie wave equation :
λ = h m v , where h is Planck's constant and m is proton's mass .
Solving for v , we get :
v = h m λ , where m = 1.67 × 10 27 k g , h = 6.626 × 10 34 J s
Substituting the given values ,we get :
v = 6.626 × 10 34 1.67 × 10 27 × 6.6 × 10 15
v = 0.6 × 10 8
v = 6 × 10 7 m/s
Hence ,the velocity of the proton is v = 6 × 10 7 m/s .
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