"I'm trying to learn linear algebra on my own. When I taught myself calculus I-III a year ago, I used Stewart's Concepts and Contexts 4th edition and I absolutely loved it. Theorems and definitions were displayed actually, the graphs were distinctive, and the problem selection was quite large. Is there a linear algebra textbook just like how Stewart's textbook changed into designed? Moreover, i am sooner or later planning to research differential equations and i'm aware that pretty a few texts overlap when coaching those topics. i would favor to study them in my view, so i might want to keep away from texts with an amazing amount of differential equation, unless there's a text that covers each fields absolutely in the identical manner that Stewart's textual content included unmarried and m

reemisorgc 2022-10-02 Answered
I'm trying to learn linear algebra on my own. When I taught myself calculus I-III a year ago, I used Stewart's Concepts and Contexts 4th edition and I absolutely loved it. Theorems and definitions were displayed actually, the graphs were distinctive, and the problem selection was quite large.
Is there a linear algebra textbook just like how Stewart's textbook changed into designed?
moreover, i am sooner or later planning to research differential equations and i'm aware that pretty a few texts overlap when coaching those topics. i would favor to study them in my view, so i might want to keep away from texts with an amazing amount of differential equation, unless there's a text that covers each fields absolutely in the identical manner that Stewart's textual content included unmarried and multivariable calculus collectively.
P.S I don't imply to be praising Stewart's. it's the only arithmetic textbook i've used to self-have a look at so I do not have a lot else to relate to.
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Answers (2)

Joel Reese
Answered 2022-10-03 Author has 17 answers
I'd say the closest contender is David Lay's Linear Algebra and its Applications.
The fabric is supplied in an approachable manner. The text is neither terse nor overly expository. it's miles made clear exactly what the crucial pieces are, with true/false questions within the sporting events to ensure you are paying attention. He moves a very good balance among emphasizing matrices and emphasizing the underlying vector space structures.
That being said, the textbook (like Stewarts') isn't always ideal. Lay has a tendency to emphasise row discount a piece extra than i would like, and emphasizes computational (in place of evidence oriented) questions a chunk a lot for my taste. however, you may do plenty worse than Lay for an creation.
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Tia English
Answered 2022-10-04 Author has 1 answers
I recommend Gilbert Strang's book "Introduction to linear algebra ". This book is just a joy to read.
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