One ounce is equal to 28.35 grams. convert 16 ounces to grams round your answe to the nearest tenth

traffig75 2022-09-27 Answered
One ounce is equal to 28.35 grams. convert 16 ounces to grams round your answe to the nearest tenth
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Answers (1)

r2t1orrso
Answered 2022-09-28 Author has 8 answers
16 ounces is equivalent to 453.6g.
Data;
1 ounce = 28.35 grams
Conversion of ounce to grams
This is the conversion of a mass unit from ounce to grams. Given that 1 ounce is equal to 28.35 grams, let us calculate how grams would be in 16 ounces.
The easiest way about this is simply multiply 16 by 28.25g
1  ounce = 28.35 g 16  ounce = x x = 16 28.35 x = 453.6 g
From the calculations above, 16 ounces is equivalent to 453.6g.
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