"Figuring out probability of two random events both happening So here's the problem: The table below shows the distribution of education level attained by US residents based on data collected during the 2010 American Community Survey: Highest level of education % Less than 9th Grade 0.10 9th to 12th no diploma 0.09 High school grad - GED 0.25 Some college No degree 0.23 Associate's degree 0.08 Bachelor's degree -- Graduate or professional degree 0.09 Answer the following questions (give all answers to 2 decimal places): a) Fill in the empty box for the proportion of US residents whose highest education level attained was a bachelors degree. b) If two individuals are chosen at random from the population, what is the probability that both will have at least a bachelor

Haven Kerr 2022-09-25 Answered
Figuring out probability of two random events both happening
So here's the problem:
The table below shows the distribution of education level attained by US residents based on data collected during the 2010 American Community Survey:
Highest level of education %
Less than 9th Grade 0.10
9th to 12th no diploma 0.09
High school grad - GED 0.25
Some college No degree 0.23
Associate's degree 0.08
Bachelor's degree --
Graduate or professional degree 0.09
Answer the following questions (give all answers to 2 decimal places):
a) Fill in the empty box for the proportion of US residents whose highest education level attained was a bachelors degree.
b) If two individuals are chosen at random from the population, what is the probability that both will have at least a bachelors degree?
c) If two individuals are chosen at random from the population, what is the probability that at least one will have some college or a college degree of some sort?
d) If two individuals are chosen at random from the population, what is the probability that exactly one will have some college or a college degree of some sort?
I managed to figure out a) which was 0.16. However, I tried a different methods to get b) but none of them worked. I answered .24, .25, and .01 but none of them were correct.
To answer b) I used the following formula:
P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) - P(A & B) = (.16) + (.09) - (.16)(.09)
which gave me .24 but that was incorrect. What am I doing wrong?
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Answers (1)

Cassie Moody
Answered 2022-09-26 Author has 10 answers
When finding probability of two independent events, you can multiply the probability of the events.
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