The number of atoms in 1 kg of carbon is given by =(12×1000)/(N_A), but if I remember correctly the number of atoms is equal to the number of moles times the Avogadro's number and hence should be =(1000×N_A)/12? It does a similar thing for the number of atoms in 1 kg of Uranium -235, which is given to be in the solution =(235×1000)/(N_A), and not =(1000×N_A)/235

ghulamu51 2022-09-24 Answered
The number of atoms in 1   k g of carbon is given by = 12 × 1000 N A , but if I remember correctly the number of atoms is equal to the number of moles times the Avogadro's number and hence should be = 1000 × N A 12 ?? It does a similar thing for the number of atoms in 1   k g of Uranium 235, which is given to be in the solution = 235 × 1000 N A , and not = 1000 × N A 235
So which is the correct answer?
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Answers (1)

Triston Donaldson
Answered 2022-09-25 Author has 10 answers
n m o l e s = 1000 g m / ( 12 g m / m o l e )
so
n a t o m = 1000 × N A / 12
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