How to measure 1/3 cup without measuring cup?

mangicele4s 2022-09-17 Answered
How to measure 1/3 cup without measuring cup?
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Answers (1)

xjiaminhoxy4
Answered 2022-09-18 Author has 9 answers
Well, 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
4 tablespoons = 1/4 cup
5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon = 1/3 cup
8 tablespoons = 1/2 cup
1 cup = 1/2 pint
2 cups = 1 pint
4 cups (2 pints) = 1 quart
4 quarts = 1 gallon
16 ounces = 1 pound
Dash or pinch = less than 1/8 teaspoon
Um, if you know these things, memorize them, then you won't need a measuring cup. Hope this helps!! And tell me if this is, or isn't the correct answer you were looking for! :)

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