How many quarts are in​ 814 ​gallons? Note: 1 gallon = 4 quarts A. 2 1/8 qt B.16 1/2 qt C.33 qt D.66 qt

Aubrie Aguilar 2022-09-17 Answered
How many quarts are in​ 814 ​gallons?
Note: 1 gallon = 4 quarts
A. 2 1/8 qt
B.16 1/2 qt
C.33 qt
D.66 qt
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Answers (1)

ahem37
Answered 2022-09-18 Author has 15 answers
answer is D
but I am confuse it can be 3256 .cuz 1  galllon  = 4  quarters. now 814 × 4 = 3256

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