What is a solution to the differential equation y'=−e^(3x)?

yamyekay3 2022-09-15 Answered
What is a solution to the differential equation y = - e 3 x ?
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Answers (1)

Mohammed Farley
Answered 2022-09-16 Author has 15 answers
If y = - e 3 x then integrating gives;
y = ( - e 3 x ) d x
y = - 1 3 e 3 x + C

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