Sample size requirements in survey If am doing some market research and want to answer the question "What percentage of the users of a service, searched for the given service online?". Lets say I go out and get people to take a survey. How do I calculate the required sample size that would create the correct distribution for a given country or region?

tamolam8 2022-09-13 Answered
Sample size requirements in survey
If am doing some market research and want to answer the question "What percentage of the users of a service, searched for the given service online?". Lets say I go out and get people to take a survey.
How do I calculate the required sample size that would create the correct distribution for a given country or region?
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Answers (1)

Raphael Singleton
Answered 2022-09-14 Author has 19 answers
If we define population as the group of all users of the service, then you want to estimate the proportion of population which searched for the service online. The required sample size can be determined based on
- confidence level
- desired size of confidence interval

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