The legs of a right triangle are 6 and 8 cm. Find the hypotenuse and the area of ​​the triangle.

calcific5z 2022-09-12 Answered
The legs of a right triangle are 6 and 8 cm. Find the hypotenuse and the area of ​​the triangle.
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Answers (2)

faliryr
Answered 2022-09-13 Author has 15 answers
a=6 cm
b=8 cm
c - ? cm
S-? c m 2
Solution:
according to the Pythagorean theorem: a 2 + b 2 = c 2
where a, b - legs, c - hypotenuse
c = a 2 + b 2 = 6 2 + 8 2 = 36 + 64 = 100 = 10 ( c m )- hypotenuse
S = 1 2 a b = 1 2 6 8 = 24 ( c m 2 )
Answer: 10cm hypotenuse ; 24 c m 2 square

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Teagan Sutton
Answered 2022-09-14 Author has 12 answers
According to the Pythagorean theorem, the square of the hypotenuse (c) of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the legs (a and b), c 2 = a 2 + b 2 .
c 2 = 6 2 + 8 2
c 2 = 100
c=10 cm.
The hypotenuse is 10 cm.
The area of ​​a triangle is half the product of its legs.
S=0.5*ab
S=0.5*8*6.
S = 24 c m 2 .
The area of ​​a triangle is 24 c m 2 .
Answer: 10 c m , 24 c m 2 .

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