Survey Results Computation Problem Solving There is a survey for a product for A number of people regarding its quality and price. B number of people are satisfied both with the quality and price. Find the number of people who are both dissatisfied with quality and price. Here’s the result of survey: Price: – Satisfied: C number of people – Dissatisfied: D number of people Quality: – Satisfied: E number of people – Dissatisfied: F number of people To be clear, C + D = A and E + F = A. A, B, C, D, E and F are actual numbers that are given in the problem but forgot them.

Randall Booker 2022-09-11 Answered
Survey Results Computation Problem Solving
There is a survey for a product for A number of people regarding its quality and price. B number of people are satisfied both with the quality and price. Find the number of people who are both dissatisfied with quality and price.
Here’s the result of survey: Price:
– Satisfied: C number of people
– Dissatisfied: D number of people
Quality:
– Satisfied: E number of people
– Dissatisfied: F number of people
To be clear, C + D = A and E + F = A.
A, B, C, D, E and F are actual numbers that are given in the problem but forgot them.
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Answers (1)

Harper Brewer
Answered 2022-09-12 Author has 16 answers
Make a table of the survey results like this:
P r i c e Q u a l i t y  Satisfied   Dissatisfied   Total  Satisfied B E Dissatisfied F Total C D A
Now you can see that the number who were satisfied with the quality but dissatisfied with the price must be E-B in order to complete the first row. In the first column, the number satisfied with the price but not with the quality is C-B. Now the table looks like this:
P r i c e Q u a l i t y  Satisfied   Dissatisfied   Total  Satisfied B E B E Dissatisfied C B F Total C D A
Finally, the number who are dissatisfied with both the price and the quality is (from the second column) D ( E B ). Or is it (from the second row) F ( C B )? Actually, these are the same: the difference is ( C + D ) ( E + F ) = A A = 0.
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