A concert venue is located 4 minutes from a large university. A group of students are planning to attend the concert and think they can get there in less time. They test this hypothesis by using social media to survey a sample of other drivers to see how long this trip took them. The null and alternative hypotheses are given. Here is the full question: a) what is the consequence of a Type I error in the context of this problem? hey conclude it will average rewer than 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is more than 4 minutes. They conclude that it will average more than 4 minutes, but the real average is 4 minutes to get there. They conclude it will average 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is less than 4 minutes. They conclude it will average rewer than 4 minutes, but

Jamar Hays 2022-09-11 Answered
A concert venue is located 4 minutes from a large university. A group of students are planning to attend the concert and think they can get there in less time. They test this hypothesis by using social media to survey a sample of other drivers to see how long this trip took them. The null and alternative hypotheses are given.
....
Here is the full question:
(a) what is the consequence of a Type I error in the context of this problem?
hey conclude it will average rewer than 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is more than 4 minutes.
They conclude that it will average more than 4 minutes, but the real average is 4 minutes to get there.
They conclude it will average 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is less than 4 minutes.
They conclude it will average rewer than 4 minutes, but the real average is 4 minutes to get there.
(6) What are the consequences of making a Type II error in the context of this problem?
They conclude it will average fewer than 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is more than 4 minutes.
They conclude that it will average more than 4 minutes, but the real average is 4 minutes to get there.
They conclude it will average 4 minutes to get there, but the real average is less than 4 minutes.
They conclude it will average fewer than 4 minutes, but the real average is 4 minutes to get there.
You can still ask an expert for help

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

Solve your problem for the price of one coffee

  • Available 24/7
  • Math expert for every subject
  • Pay only if we can solve it
Ask Question

Answers (1)

acilschoincg8
Answered 2022-09-12 Author has 12 answers
The null hypothesis is that the mean time to get there is 4 minutes against the alternative that it takes less than 4 minutes to get there.
A type I error is when you reject the null hypothesis when the null hypothesis is actually true.
A type II error is when you fail to reject the null hypothesis when the alternative hypothesis is true.
Can you go from here?
Did you like this example?
Subscribe for all access

Expert Community at Your Service

  • Live experts 24/7
  • Questions are typically answered in as fast as 30 minutes
  • Personalized clear answers
Learn more

You might be interested in

asked 2022-09-09
Averaging Whole Numbers
I'm curious which way is correct when rounding whole numbers. My issue is that the customer wants decimal places included in the average when the User only ever will select whole numbers in a range from 1-5. In my head it makes sense to return a whole number instead of a rational or irrational number.
Results out of 5 questions:
Question1 = 4
Question2 = 3
Question3 = 5
Question4 = 3
Question5 = 2
SUM = 17
which is correct for the average 3 or 3.4?
asked 2022-09-21
A recent survey of post-secondary education students in Canada revealed that 73% know what type of job they want, when they graduate. You are to randomly pick 32 post-secondary education students across the country, and ask each the following question: Have you selected a particular career path?
You have defined the random variable X to represent the number, out of 32 post-secondary students chosen, who responded YES
If you continued to select additional students, what is the probability that the 50th student selected will be the 39th student to respond YES?
asked 2022-09-17
I have a bag of toys. 10% of the toys are balls. 10% of the toys are blue.
If I draw one toy at random, what're the odds I'll draw a blue ball?
asked 2022-11-20
Homotopy equivalence between two mapping tori of compositions
For any maps s : X K there is defined a homotopy equivalence
T ( d s : X X ) T ( s d : K K ) ; ( x , t ) ( s ( x ) , t ) .
Here, T(f) denotes the mapping torus of a self-map f : Z Z (not necessarily a homeomorphism). It is very surprising to me that this holds with no extra conditions on d and s. I'm guessing that the homotopy inverse is the map:
T ( s d ) T ( d s ) , ( k , t ) ( d ( k ) , t ) .
If the above is a genuine homotopy inverse, then the map:
( x , t ) ( d ( s ( x ) ) , t )
would have to be homotopic to the identity somehow. However, after banging my head against the wall on this for a while I can't come up with a valid homotopy. So my questions are:
Is the map T ( s d ) T ( d s ) I've defined above actually a homotopy inverse? If so, what is the homotopy from the composition I wrote down above to the identity map?
Is there a better one that makes the homotopy obvious?
asked 2022-09-12
Tensor product of varieties : What's this notation V 1 V 2 ?
I saw this notation V = V 1 V 2 in a survey on universal algebra, where was a variety, but the survey in question didn't define this notation. Could anyone explain what it means ?
asked 2022-09-08
Suppose that in a city of 100 people, a survey conclude that 30 of them do not agree (says 'no') with the building of a new luxury apartment. If you randomly chose 12 people in the city what is the probability that 2 to 6 of them are those who disagree with the building of the new luxury apartment?
This seemed to be a binomial probability question.... though I fail to recall how to do so.
bonus point if you know how to solve this in minitab!
asked 2022-09-16
I have a result that uses ordered fields. However, I am ignorant of the literature surrounding ordered fields. I have read the basic facts about them, such as those contained in the wikipedia page. However, in the introduction, I would like to provide some motivation.
My result has the property that if it holds for some ordered field k, then it holds for any ordered subfield of k. Does that mean it is enough to prove my result for real-closed ordered fields?
I also read the statement that to prove a 1st order logic statement for a real-closed ordered field, then it is enough to prove it for one real-closed ordered field, such as R for instance. Can someone please provide a reference for that?
A mathematician mentioned to me a classical link between iterated quadratic extensions and ordered fields. What is the precise statement please?
I would also like a number of interesting examples of ordered fields. I know for example of an interesting non-archimedean example using rational functions (that I have learned about from the wikipedia page on ordered fields).
Does anyone know of a survey on ordered fields, or a reference containing answers to my questions above?

New questions