Question

Hypothesis Testing Review For each problem below, simply identify the null and alternative hypotheses. Use appropriate notation/symbols. You do not ha

Significance tests
ANSWERED
asked 2020-12-07
Hypothesis Testing Review
For each problem below, simply identify the null and alternative hypotheses. Use appropriate notation/symbols. You do not have to run any hypothesis tests, although it's good practice and I'll post answers for all of them.
1) A simple random sample of 44 men from a normally distributed population results in a standard deviation of 10.7 beats per minute. The normal range of pulse rates of adults is typically given as 60 to 100 beats per minute. If the range rule of thumb is applied to that normal range, the result is a standard deviation of 10 beats per minute. Use the sample results with a 0.10 significance level to test the claim that pulse rates of men have a standard deviation equal to 10 beats per minute.
2) In 1997, a survey of 880 households showed that 145 of them use e-mail. Use those sample results to test the claim that more than 15% of households use e-mail. Use a 0.05 significance level.

Answers (1)

2020-12-08
Step 1
1)
From the provided information,
The population standard deviation \((\sigma) = 10\)
The claim is that pulse rates of men have a standard deviation equal to 10 beats per minute.
The hypotheses can be constructed as:
\(H_{0}: \sigma = 10\)
\(H_{1}: \sigma \neq 10\)
Step 2
2)
From the provided information,
The claim is that more than 15% of households use e-mail.
The hypotheses for this test can be constructed as:
\(H_{0}: p = 0.15\)
\(H_{1}: p > 0.15\)
0
 
Best answer

expert advice

Need a better answer?

Relevant Questions

asked 2021-05-14
When σ is unknown and the sample size is \(\displaystyle{n}\geq{30}\), there are tow methods for computing confidence intervals for μμ. Method 1: Use the Student's t distribution with d.f. = n - 1. This is the method used in the text. It is widely employed in statistical studies. Also, most statistical software packages use this method. Method 2: When \(\displaystyle{n}\geq{30}\), use the sample standard deviation s as an estimate for σσ, and then use the standard normal distribution. This method is based on the fact that for large samples, s is a fairly good approximation for σσ. Also, for large n, the critical values for the Student's t distribution approach those of the standard normal distribution. Consider a random sample of size n = 31, with sample mean x¯=45.2 and sample standard deviation s = 5.3. (c) Compare intervals for the two methods. Would you say that confidence intervals using a Student's t distribution are more conservative in the sense that they tend to be longer than intervals based on the standard normal distribution?
asked 2020-10-23
1. Find each of the requested values for a population with a mean of \(? = 40\), and a standard deviation of \(? = 8\) A. What is the z-score corresponding to \(X = 52?\) B. What is the X value corresponding to \(z = - 0.50?\) C. If all of the scores in the population are transformed into z-scores, what will be the values for the mean and standard deviation for the complete set of z-scores? D. What is the z-score corresponding to a sample mean of \(M=42\) for a sample of \(n = 4\) scores? E. What is the z-scores corresponding to a sample mean of \(M= 42\) for a sample of \(n = 6\) scores? 2. True or false: a. All normal distributions are symmetrical b. All normal distributions have a mean of 1.0 c. All normal distributions have a standard deviation of 1.0 d. The total area under the curve of all normal distributions is equal to 1 3. Interpret the location, direction, and distance (near or far) of the following zscores: \(a. -2.00 b. 1.25 c. 3.50 d. -0.34\) 4. You are part of a trivia team and have tracked your team’s performance since you started playing, so you know that your scores are normally distributed with \(\mu = 78\) and \(\sigma = 12\). Recently, a new person joined the team, and you think the scores have gotten better. Use hypothesis testing to see if the average score has improved based on the following 8 weeks’ worth of score data: \(82, 74, 62, 68, 79, 94, 90, 81, 80\). 5. You get hired as a server at a local restaurant, and the manager tells you that servers’ tips are $42 on average but vary about \($12 (\mu = 42, \sigma = 12)\). You decide to track your tips to see if you make a different amount, but because this is your first job as a server, you don’t know if you will make more or less in tips. After working 16 shifts, you find that your average nightly amount is $44.50 from tips. Test for a difference between this value and the population mean at the \(\alpha = 0.05\) level of significance.
asked 2021-01-17
A new thermostat has been engineered for the frozen food cases in large supermarkets. Both the old and new thermostats hold temperatures at an average of \(25^{\circ}F\). However, it is hoped that the new thermostat might be more dependable in the sense that it will hold temperatures closer to \(25^{\circ}F\). One frozen food case was equipped with the new thermostat, and a random sample of 21 temperature readings gave a sample variance of 5.1. Another similar frozen food case was equipped with the old thermostat, and a random sample of 19 temperature readings gave a sample variance of 12.8. Test the claim that the population variance of the old thermostat temperature readings is larger than that for the new thermostat. Use a \(5\%\) level of significance. How could your test conclusion relate to the question regarding the dependability of the temperature readings? (Let population 1 refer to data from the old thermostat.)
(a) What is the level of significance?
State the null and alternate hypotheses.
\(H0:?_{1}^{2}=?_{2}^{2},H1:?_{1}^{2}>?_{2}^{2}H0:?_{1}^{2}=?_{2}^{2},H1:?_{1}^{2}\neq?_{2}^{2}H0:?_{1}^{2}=?_{2}^{2},H1:?_{1}^{2}?_{2}^{2},H1:?_{1}^{2}=?_{2}^{2}\)
(b) Find the value of the sample F statistic. (Round your answer to two decimal places.)
What are the degrees of freedom?
\(df_{N} = ?\)
\(df_{D} = ?\)
What assumptions are you making about the original distribution?
The populations follow independent normal distributions. We have random samples from each population.The populations follow dependent normal distributions. We have random samples from each population.The populations follow independent normal distributions.The populations follow independent chi-square distributions. We have random samples from each population.
(c) Find or estimate the P-value of the sample test statistic. (Round your answer to four decimal places.)
(d) Based on your answers in parts (a) to (c), will you reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis?
At the ? = 0.05 level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.At the ? = 0.05 level, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant. At the ? = 0.05 level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are not statistically significant.At the ? = 0.05 level, we reject the null hypothesis and conclude the data are statistically significant.
(e) Interpret your conclusion in the context of the application.
Reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that the population variance is larger in the old thermostat temperature readings.Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is sufficient evidence that the population variance is larger in the old thermostat temperature readings. Fail to reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that the population variance is larger in the old thermostat temperature readings.Reject the null hypothesis, there is insufficient evidence that the population variance is larger in the old thermostat temperature readings.
asked 2021-06-13
1. Who seems to have more variability in their shoe sizes, men or women?
a) Men
b) Women
c) Neither group show variability
d) Flag this Question
2. In general, why use the estimate of \(n-1\) rather than n in the computation of the standard deviation and variance?
a) The estimate n-1 is better because it is used for calculating the population variance and standard deviation
b) The estimate n-1 is never used to calculate the sample variance and standard deviation
c) \(n-1\) provides an unbiased estimate of the population and allows more variability when using a sample and gives a better mathematical estimate of the population
d) The estimate n-1 is better because it is use for calculation of both the population and sample variance as well as standard deviation.
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|}\hline \text{Shoe Size (in cm)} & \text{Gender (M of F)} \\ \hline 25.7 & M \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 23.8 & F \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 26.7 & M \\ \hline 23.8 & F \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 25.7 & M \\ \hline 25.7 & F \\ \hline 23.5 & F \\ \hline 23.1 & F \\ \hline 26 & M \\ \hline 23.5 & F \\ \hline 26.7 & F \\ \hline 26 & M \\ \hline 23.1 & F \\ \hline 25.1 & F \\ \hline 27 & M \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 23.5 & F \\ \hline 23.8 & F \\ \hline 27 & M \\ \hline 25.7 & F \\ \hline \end{array}\)
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|}\hline \text{Shoe Size (in cm)} & \text{Gender (M of F)} \\ \hline 27.6 & M \\ \hline 26.9 & F \\ \hline 26 & F \\ \hline 28.4 & M \\ \hline 23.5 & F \\ \hline 27 & F \\ \hline 25.1 & F \\ \hline 28.4 & M \\ \hline 23.1 & F \\ \hline 23.8 & F \\ \hline 26 & F \\ \hline 25.4 & M \\ \hline 23.8 & F \\ \hline 24.8 & M \\ \hline 25.1 & F \\ \hline 24.8 & F \\ \hline 26 & M \\ \hline 25.4 & F \\ \hline 26 & M \\ \hline 27 & M \\ \hline 25.7 & F \\ \hline 27 & M \\ \hline 23.5 & F \\ \hline 29 & F \\ \hline \end{array}\)
asked 2021-01-31
In there a relationship between confidence intervals and two-tailed hypothesis tests? The answer is yes. Let c be the level of confidence used to construct a confidence interval from sample data. Let * be the level of significance for a two-tailed hypothesis test. The following statement applies to hypothesis tests of the mean:
For a two-tailed hypothesis test with level of significance a and null hypothesis \(H_{0} : \mu = k\) we reject Ho whenever k falls outside the \(c = 1 — \alpha\) confidence interval for \(\mu\) based on the sample data. When A falls within the \(c = 1 — \alpha\) confidence interval. we do reject \(H_{0}\).
For a one-tailed hypothesis test with level of significance Ho : \(\mu = k\) and null hypothesiswe reject Ho whenever A falls outsidethe \(c = 1 — 2\alpha\) confidence interval for p based on the sample data. When A falls within the \(c = 1 — 2\alpha\) confidence interval, we do not reject \(H_{0}\).
A corresponding relationship between confidence intervals and two-tailed hypothesis tests is also valid for other parameters, such as p, \(\mu1 — \mu_2,\ and\ p_{1}, - p_{2}\).
(a) Consider the hypotheses \(H_{0} : \mu_{1} — \mu_{2} = O\ and\ H_{1} : \mu_{1} — \mu_{2} \neq\) Suppose a 95% confidence interval for \(\mu_{1} — \mu_{2}\) contains only positive numbers. Should you reject the null hypothesis when \(\alpha = 0.05\)? Why or why not?
asked 2020-12-24
In there a relationship between confidence intervals and two-tailed hypothesis tests? The answer is yes. Let c be the level of confidence used to construct a confidence interval from sample data. Let * be the level of significance for a two-tailed hypothesis test. The following statement applies to hypothesis tests of the mean: For a two-tailed hypothesis test with level of significance a and null hypothesis H_0 : mu = k we reject Ho whenever k falls outside the c = 1 — alpha confidence interval for mu based on the sample data. When A falls within the c = 1 — alpha confidence interval. we do reject H_0. For a one-tailed hypothesis test with level of significance Ho : mu = k and null hypothesiswe reject Ho whenever A falls outsidethe c = 1 — 2alpha confidence interval for p based on the sample data. When A falls within thec = 1 — 2alpha confidence interval, we do not reject H_0. A corresponding relationship between confidence intervals and two-tailed hypothesis tests is also valid for other parameters, such as p,mu1 — mu_2, and p_1, - p_2. (b) Consider the hypotheses H_0 : p_1 — p_2 = O and H_1 : p_1 — p_2 != Suppose a 98% confidence interval for p_1 — p_2 contains only positive numbers. Should you reject the null hypothesis when alpha = 0.05? Why or why not?
asked 2020-11-08
Testing for a Linear Correlation. In Exercises 13–28, construct a scatterplot, and find the value of the linear correlation coefficient r. Also find the P-value or the critical values of r from Table A-6. Use a significance level of \(\alpha = 0.05\). Determine whether there is sufficient evidence to support a claim of a linear correlation between the two variables. (Save your work because the same data sets will be used in Section 10-2 exercises.) Lemons and Car Crashes Listed below are annual data for various years. The data are weights (metric tons) of lemons imported from Mexico and U.S. car crash fatality rates per 100,000 population [based on data from “The Trouble with QSAR (or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Fallacy),” by Stephen Johnson, Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, Vol. 48, No. 1]. Is there sufficient evidence to conclude that there is a linear correlation between weights of lemon imports from Mexico and U.S. car fatality rates? Do the results suggest that imported lemons cause car fatalities? \(\begin{matrix} \text{Lemon Imports} & 230 & 265 & 358 & 480 & 530\\ \text{Crashe Fatality Rate} & 15.9 & 15.7 & 15.4 & 15.3 & 14.9\\ \end{matrix}\)
asked 2021-02-25
We will now add support for register-memory ALU operations to the classic five-stage RISC pipeline. To offset this increase in complexity, all memory addressing will be restricted to register indirect (i.e., all addresses are simply a value held in a register; no offset or displacement may be added to the register value). For example, the register-memory instruction add x4, x5, (x1) means add the contents of register x5 to the contents of the memory location with address equal to the value in register x1 and put the sum in register x4. Register-register ALU operations are unchanged. The following items apply to the integer RISC pipeline:
a. List a rearranged order of the five traditional stages of the RISC pipeline that will support register-memory operations implemented exclusively by register indirect addressing.
b. Describe what new forwarding paths are needed for the rearranged pipeline by stating the source, destination, and information transferred on each needed new path.
c. For the reordered stages of the RISC pipeline, what new data hazards are created by this addressing mode? Give an instruction sequence illustrating each new hazard.
d. List all of the ways that the RISC pipeline with register-memory ALU operations can have a different instruction count for a given program than the original RISC pipeline. Give a pair of specific instruction sequences, one for the original pipeline and one for the rearranged pipeline, to illustrate each way.
Hint for (d): Give a pair of instruction sequences where the RISC pipeline has “more” instructions than the reg-mem architecture. Also give a pair of instruction sequences where the RISC pipeline has “fewer” instructions than the reg-mem architecture.
asked 2021-01-10
A company is marketing a new product they say works better than the traditional test tube. There is so much interest in the product that 30 different labs around the world are testing the claim that this product is actually better. If each study uses an alpha level (alpha) of .10, and if the null hypothesis is true (that the test tube isn't any better that the traditional one), how many of the hypothesis tests would we expect to incorrectly find statistical significance (that is, conclude that the new test tube is better, when it actually isn't)?
asked 2021-06-05
Use the following Normal Distribution table to calculate the area under the Normal Curve (Shaded area in the Figure) when \(Z=1.3\) and \(H=0.05\);
Assume that you do not have vales of the area beyond \(z=1.2\) in the table; i.e. you may need to use the extrapolation.
Check your calculated value and compare with the values in the table \([for\ z=1.3\ and\ H=0.05]\).
Calculate your percentage of error in the estimation.
How do I solve this problem using extrapolation?
\(\begin{array}{|c|c|}\hline Z+H & Prob. & Extrapolation \\ \hline 1.20000 & 0.38490 & Differences \\ \hline 1.21000 & 0.38690 & 0.00200 \\ \hline 1.22000 & 0.38880 & 0.00190 \\ \hline 1.23000 & 0.39070 & 0.00190 \\ \hline 1.24000 & 0.39250 & 0.00180 \\ \hline 1.25000 & 0.39440 & 0.00190 \\ \hline 1.26000 & 0.39620 & 0.00180 \\ \hline 1.27000 & 0.39800 & 0.00180 \\ \hline 1.28000 & 0.39970 & 0.00170 \\ \hline 1.29000 & 0.40150 & 0.00180 \\ \hline 1.30000 & 0.40320 & 0.00170 \\ \hline 1.31000 & 0.40490 & 0.00170 \\ \hline 1.32000 & 0.40660 & 0.00170 \\ \hline 1.33000 & 0.40830 & 0.00170 \\ \hline 1.34000 & 0.41010 & 0.00180 \\ \hline 1.35000 & 0.41190 & 0.00180 \\ \hline \end{array}\)

You might be interested in

...