Tell whether the question is a statistical question. Explain. How many songs are on your MP3 player?

geduiwelh 2021-02-11 Answered
Tell whether the question is a statistical question. Explain.
How many songs are on your MP3 player?
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BleabyinfibiaG
Answered 2021-02-12 Author has 118 answers
A statistical question is one where you can expect to get a variety of answers, not one single answer. The purpose of asking statistical questions is to study the distribution (such as the range) and tendency (such as the median and mean) of the answers.
While the number of songs on your MP3 player is one specific value, if multiple people are asked this question you would get a variety of answers, such as 140, 90, 260, etc. The question is then a statistical question.
An example of a question that would not be statistical could be: "How many inches are in 1 foot?". This question has 1 correct answer of 12 inches so no matter how many people you ask, you would expect to get the same answer of 12 inches.
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