(a)Find the F-statistic from ANOVA table. Find the p-value. (b)Explain about three p-values for the three tests in parts(a),(b),and(c).

ossidianaZ 2020-11-27 Answered
(a)Find the F-statistic from ANOVA table.
Find the p-value.
(b)Explain about three p-values for the three tests in parts(a),(b),and(c).
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Answered 2020-11-28 Author has 92 answers
(a)From the table of ANOVA, the F-statistic for the test is 6.50, and the p-value is 0.015.
(b)From the computer output, the p-value of 0.015 is equal for all three tests.
the regression model with single predictor, the p-value is same for all three tests.
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