I'm wondering that why people doesn't care about vector's location. but, when we add the vectors, we move two or one vector to unite the vector's start point. and this mean location is important. but, when we learn very first of vector, we learn the vector doesn't matter where it is. in this point, I'm so confused because I can't find the reason that why vector's location doesn't matter. so i want to ask you - why the vector's location is not important?

schnelltcr 2022-08-14 Answered
I'm wondering that why people doesn't care about vector's location. but, when we add the vectors, we move two or one vector to unite the vector's start point. and this mean location is important. but, when we learn very first of vector, we learn the vector doesn't matter where it is. in this point, I'm so confused because I can't find the reason that why vector's location doesn't matter. so i want to ask you - why the vector's location is not important?
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Answers (1)

Kasen Schroeder
Answered 2022-08-15 Author has 21 answers
What you are probably getting at are 'free vectors'. Their description in school math is usually something like x = ( a , b ) - that means, go right a units and up b units. Ok, but starting from where?? It doesn't matter. That is the meaning of 'freedom' in this sense. You can 'freely' pick the point on the plane from which you apply the vector x , for instance the origin.
We also have vectors called 'bound vectors' for which location does matter.
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