Assume that the heights of women are normally distributed with a mean of 63.3 inches and a standard deviation of 2.5 inches. Seventy five women are randomly selected. What is the mean of the sample means?

allucinemsj 2022-08-11 Answered
Assume that the heights of women are normally distributed with a mean of 63.3 inches and a standard deviation of 2.5 inches. Seventy five women are randomly selected. What is the mean of the sample means?
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Answers (1)

Nicole Soto
Answered 2022-08-12 Author has 10 answers
Mean of sample means = population mean = 63.3
Standard deviation of sample means = σ n = 2.5 75 = 0.288675
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Euclid's view and Klein's view of Geometry and Associativity in Group
One common item in the have a look at of Euclidean geometry (Euclid's view) is "congruence" relation- specifically ""congruence of triangles"". We recognize that this congruence relation is an equivalence relation
Every triangle is congruent to itself
If triangle T 1 is congruent to triangle T 2 then T 2 is congruent to T 1 .
If T 1 is congruent to T 2 and T 2 is congruent to T 3 , then T 1 is congruent to T 3 .
This congruence relation (from Euclid's view) can be translated right into a relation coming from "organizations". allow I s o ( R 2 ) denote the set of all isometries of Euclidean plan (=distance maintaining maps from plane to itself). Then the above family members may be understood from Klein's view as:
∃ an identity element in I s o ( R 2 ) which takes every triangle to itself.
If g I s o ( R 2 ) is an element taking triangle T 1 to T 2 , then g 1 I s o ( R 2 ) which takes T 2 to T 1 .
If g I s o ( R 2 ) takes T 1 to T 2 and g I s o ( R 2 ) takes T 2 to T 3 then h g I s o ( R 2 ) which takes T 1 to T 3 .
One can see that in Klein's view, three axioms in the definition of group appear. But in the definition of "Group" there is "associativity", which is not needed in above formulation of Euclids view to Kleins view of grometry.
Question: What is the reason of introducing associativity in the definition of group? If we look geometry from Klein's view, does "associativity" of group puts restriction on geometry?