I am stuck on graphing y=(x-3) sqrt x.

crazygbyo 2022-08-08 Answered
Graphing functions with calculus
I am stuck on graphing y = ( x 3 ) x
I am pretty sure that the domain is all positive numbers including zero. The y intercept is 0, x is 0 and 3.
There are no asymptotes or symmetry.
Finding the interval of increase or decrease I take the derivative which will give me x + x 3 2 x .
Finding zeroes for this I subtract x and then multiply by the denominator 2 x = x 3.
This gives me 3 as a zero, but this isn't correct according to the book so I am stuck. I am not sure what is wrong.
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Answers (1)

Brogan Navarro
Answered 2022-08-09 Author has 24 answers
Explanation:
Your solution of y = 0 is incorrect.
x + x 3 2 x = 0 x 3 2 x = x x 3 = 2 x x = ?
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