Finding new stable superheavy elements is big interests in nuclear physics. Nuclides with Z>92 are not found in nature, but can be made artificially. Usually these nuclides become more unstable as their atomic number increases. But, the island of stability predicts there are some stable isotopes of superheavy elements. My question is why finding stable superheavy element is important? Is it just for academic curiosity? Or is there some important application?

Ebone6v 2022-08-08 Answered
Finding new stable superheavy elements is big interests in nuclear physics.
Nuclides with Z > 92 are not found in nature, but can be made artificially.
Usually these nuclides become more unstable as their atomic number increases.
But, the island of stability predicts there are some stable isotopes of superheavy elements.
My question is why finding stable superheavy element is important?
Is it just for academic curiosity? Or is there some important application?
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Answers (1)

Favatc6
Answered 2022-08-09 Author has 17 answers
"Is it just for academic curiosity?"
It would be useful to know if our predictions are actually correct, even through there's wide agreement they are.
One could say the same of the Higgs - we already knew what it did and most of its properties. But there was always the nagging doubt that it wasn't there.
"Or is there some important application?"
No.
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