What is the level of significance? State the null and alternate hypotheses.

tricotasu 2020-11-26 Answered
What is the level of significance? State the null and alternate hypotheses.
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Margot Mill
Answered 2020-11-27 Author has 106 answers
The level of significance, α=0.05.
The population variance, σ2=0.552=0.3025.
As the null hypothesis, assume that the population variance of petal length is equal to 0.3025 and alternative hypothesis is that the population variance of petal length is greater than 0.3025.
The null hypothesis for testing is defined as,
H0:σ2=0.3025
The alternative hypothesis is defined as,
H1:σ2>0.3025
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