Show that every two blocks have at most one vertex in common

granuliet1u 2022-08-03 Answered
Show that every two blocks have at most one vertex in common
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Answers (1)

nedervdq3
Answered 2022-08-04 Author has 13 answers
let us consider a cube of lenght L
If we cut the cube into n number of blocks,we can find the atmost one vertex in common.
consider a 3*3 rubox cube.
In this we can see the a cube of one side is not having a common vertex with the block of the other side of the cube
where as the block of one side of the cube will have a common vertex of one with the block of the same side.
Hence we can say that the two blocks can have at most one vertex as common

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