is the product of a rational number and an integer is not an integer true or false?

Adrianna Macias 2022-07-31 Answered
is the product of a rational number and an integer is not an integer true or false?
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Answers (1)

uavklarajo
Answered 2022-08-01 Author has 17 answers
Every integer is a rational number, since each integer n can be written in the form n/1. Product of a rational number and an integer depends on whether the rational number is integer or not. If the rational number is an integer, then the product is integer. If the rational number is not an integer, the product is not an integer.
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